Author Topic: Beidler-Viken Twin Lens Child Portrait Camera 1948  (Read 6392 times)

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Offline PHSNE1

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Beidler-Viken Twin Lens Child Portrait Camera 1948
« on: July 10, 2011, 03:50:56 PM »
I would like to locate the collector that bought the camera at auction in 2007. I am well into the history of this camera & inventor! There were only 3 made I was told by my friend Charles DuBois Hodges (remember the fellow that took the Charter Member photo?) who operated these cameras & sold one to me many yrs ago before he died in 74. The reference Internet address below shows the camera that must be a first build as it is not mostly wood as my version is! See mine on Facebook "Antique Cameras".
I have also been looking for lenses on line for mine camera a bit lately. The Ilex Photoplastic lenses for 5X7 were used on the Beidler-Viken camera.. The Smithsonian (they thought it was a stereo camera) has the 3rd one. I am the only one with an operating booklet for it. It was designed for child photography! It took 2 operators to use it, one to keep it in focus & one to trip shutter. Dick
http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=52188

Offline PHSNE1

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Re: Beidler-Viken Twin Lens Child Portrait Camera 1948
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2013, 09:12:02 AM »
THe camera shown on that web site as sold, was a 1948 version. My Beidler-Viken Twin Lens camera is the 1927 version made of wood. It is  made of two 5x7 cameras hitched together with a cam that focuses both at same time by one operator. They were made by Gunlack Mahatten Optical Co for Beidler-Viken. THere was also a 6-1/2 X 8-1/2 version. New info says there could have been as many as 20 made for all versions. In 1928, Underwood & Underwood in NY had exclusive rights to to use cameras.

Laura

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Re: Beidler-Viken Twin Lens Child Portrait Camera 1948
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2014, 08:15:05 PM »
I have been searching the internet to find out about the twin lens camera because I have been told for many years that my great-great uncle, Don Beidler, was the inventor of this set up.  I was very excited to see your post and wondered if you could share your knowledge about it.  Don had triplet nieces, one of them was my grandmother, that he photographed on a regular basis.  What great subjects for a child portrait camera.  I was told that the camera was in the Smithsonian and did not realize that there was more than one of them.  I have read in an old newspaper clipping that A. J. Viken, a man highly skillful in the mechanical end of photography was employed by Mr. Beidler in his studio in the Lyon and Healy building in, I believe, Chicago. Mr. Beidler was born Aug. 8, 1885 in Mt. Pulaski, Illinois and died at the age of 58 on Oct. 21, 1943.